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  © 2007 Fabian Rimfors

Chocolate consumption in kilograms per person and country:

Since 1998 Sweden has advanced from 11th place to 8th place in 2002.

Source: 2002 International Statistics of Cabisco/ICCO.

 

Cocoa bean production per country in thousand tonnes:

The Ivory Coast leads the way for the African countries' struggle against the use of vegetable fat in chocolate.

Source: 2004 LMC International, ICCO, ED&F Man.

 

World's top 10 global chocolate manufacturers:

Company:

Total Sales 2002
US$ Billions:

Mars Inc.

7,5

Nestlé

7,2

Hershey Foods

4,5

Cadbury Schweppes

4,4

Ferrero

3,9

Kraft Foods

2,8

Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd.

1,9

Barry Callebaut

1,8

Lindt & Sprungli

1,1

Lotte Confectionery Co

0,9

Source: Top 100 Global Confectionery Companies. Candy Industry, 168 (1): 35-39, January 2003.

 

Chocolate's nutritional information:

100 grams

Pure
chocolate

Milk-
chocolate

White
chocolate

Protein (g)

4,7

8,4

8,0

Fat (g)

29,2

30,3

30,9

Calories (kcal)

525

529

529

Carbohydrate (g)

64,8

59,4

58,3

Calcium (mg)

38

220

270

Magnesium (mg)

100

55

26

Iron (mg)

2,4

1,6

0,2

Zink (mg)

0,2

0,2

0,9

Vitamin A (µg)

40

40

75

Vitamin E (mg)

0,85

0,74

1,14

Vitamin B1 (mg)

0,07

0,10

0,08

Vitamin B2 (mg)

0,08

0,23

0,49

Vitamin B3 (mg)

0,4

0,2

0,2

Vitamin B6 (mg)

0,07

0,07

0,07

Vitamin B12 (µg)

-

trace

trace

Folate (µg)

10

10

10

Source: McCane and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th edition.
For further information and facts visit the Finnish National Public Health Institute's Website.

 

The cocoa bean's fields of application:

World cocoa bean production for 2004/05 is forecast at 3.194 billion tonnes according to the ICCO. However, it is not possible to say exactly what percentage of this will be used to make chocolate. A rough indication would be that after processing one-third of production remains as cocoa liquor and the rest is pressed to make cocoa butter and cocoa powder. The majority of the cocoa butter is used in chocolate production along with the cocoa liquor. This indicates therefore that roughly two-thirds of bean production is used to make chocolate and one-third to make cocoa powder. Cocoa butter is also used in the manufacture of cosmetics, but the usage is very low. Research is being carried out into other uses for cocoa such as potash, animal feed, jams, alcoholic drinks etc, but again the usage is very low.

 

World cocoa consumption:

In its Quarterly Bulletin of Cocoa Statistics, ICCO publishes estimates of the annual consumption of cocoa (that is the cocoa content of chocolate confectionery and other products containing cocoa calculated as grindings of beans plus net imports of cocoa products and of chocolate and chocolate products in beans equivalent) in the leading cocoa-consuming countries.

In the 2001/02 cocoa year world cocoa consumption was around 0.53 kilograms (1.17 pounds) per head, or 0.97 kilograms (2.14 pounds) per head excluding China, India and Indonesia whose large populations have a disproportionate effect on world per capita consumption. There are, however, wide variations in consumption levels between the regions. Countries in Europe consume on average around 1.87 kg (4.12 lbs) per head, the Americas 1.20 kg (2.65 lbs), Asia and Oceania 0.11 kg (0.24 lbs) and Africa 0.13 kg (0.29 lbs).

Source: ICCO Quarterly Bulletin of Cocoa Statistics, 29 (3), 2002/2003.

 

Ingredients in eating chocolate:

Quality chocolate

56-70% cocoa solids, to include 31% cocoa butter
29-43% sugar
1% lecithin and pure vanilla extract

 

Mass-produced milk chocolate

11% cocoa solids
3% vegetable fat
20% milk solids
65% sugar
1% lecithin and synthetic vanillin

Source: McFadden, C. 2000. Chocolate - A Celebration of the World's Most Additive Food. London:Hermes House.

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Statistics and facts for cocoa and chocolate consumption, production, ingredients etc.

 

Ildefonso Mendoza Löwenhielm

 

 

 

 

According to the latest statistics The Ivory Coast produced 1,24 billion tonnes of cocoa beans. About 1 billion cacao farmers yield the whole harvest. This means that every cacao farmer produces on average of slightly more than one tonne of cocoa beans per capita a year. 87% of all cocoa is produced on family owned orchards.

 

 

 

 

An old Marabou posterfrom 1920 by A. Cornetti.

 

 

Cacao Van Houten, © Privet Livemont, London.

 

 

 

The International Cocoa Organization

 

 

The ideal temperature for storing chocolate is about 16°C (61°F).

 

 

Chocolate starts to melt at 20°C (68°F) and is completely melted and deformed at 32°C (87°F).

 

A Chocolat Carpentier poster from 1895.